Building Materials Containing Asbestos - ACMs

Author: Pacific Northwest Inspections Group, LLC   Date: 07-Nov-2014.   Category: Asbestos   Add to Favorites 

 

Asbestos is still allowed to be in materials today and is only Banned in a few products. So until testing proves otherwise we assume ALL materials are Positive until proved otherwise. Here are some materials we found tested positive in Seattle commercial and residential buildings.

In 1989, the EPA attempted to enact the “asbestos ban and phase out rule,” under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), extending the ban on asbestos containing materials, only to have it overturned by the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1991. However, six asbestos containing product categories listed in the 1989 rule are still subject to the asbestos ban, these are corrugated paper, rollboard, commercial paper, specialty paper, flooring felt and any new uses of asbestos. With this, numerous products were not banned after the 1991 court ruling including materials such as asbestos-cement corrugated sheet, asbestos-cement flat sheet, asbestos clothing, pipeline wrap and others. Therefore, structures built after 1990 which contain any of these building materials may contain asbestos. It should also be understood, our neighbors to the north and south (Canada & Mexico), along with many other countries in the world, still actively mine asbestos for commercial use. With the enactment of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the fact that the EPA does nottrack the manufacture, processing, or distribution of asbestos-containing products within commerce; some asbestos containing materials may still be available for sale and use in the United States.

Asbestos may be present in textured paint, popcorn ceilings, sheetrock taping compound, and in patching compounds used on wall and ceiling joints. Their use was banned in 1977 and existing materials/stock was allowed to be used....so most assumed gone in 1980.  Home inspectors and Realtors are not legally allowed to sample materials for ACM, only an AHERA accredited inspector may do so. Building owners are also not permitted to collect samples for rentals or commercial property.

Some listed items are contributed from other AHERA inspectors.

Attic Insulation Asbestos

  • Vapor barrier behind brick veneer
  • Vapor barrier on the interior side of exterior walls behind plaster
  • Gypsum roof deck (this is less often ACM, but I've found it on at least 3 roofs)
  • Mastic / vapor barrier below floor filler and flooring
  • Vapor barrier below terrazzo floors.
  • Bituminous waterproofing on concrete foundation walls below grade
  • Built-up roofing UNDER concrete
  • Transite breaker blocks for electrical circuits
  • Transite board behind electrical panels
  • Elevator cars coated with a black sealant
  • Corrugated asbestos paper insulation in elevator doors
  • Transite inside metal partition walls for offices/cubicles
  • Flower pots
  • Glue inside partition walls
  • Cisterns
  • Cowling around roof vent fans
  • Elevator brake shoes
  • Clutches in conveyor belts and other equipment
  • Framing around radiator
  • Loose fill attic insulation ("Karsolite" & "Zonolite")
  • Mortar was used to insulate hot water piping in homes
  • Distance holders used with lightning conductors
  • Brick was used intermittently in the masonry walls of schools to nail into
  • Fiber backing on the back of fiberglass roofing composite shingles
  • Plaster de Paris
  • Core on fiberglass pipe insulation
  • (vermiculite) in thick plaster base coat beneath scratch and finish coat
  • Paper on fiberglass bats (muck like kraft back) within metal walls of an insulated rail car
  • Loose fill attic insulation
  • Fire door
  • Spray-on Fireproofing added to the concrete foundation
  • Sink undercoating
  • Butterfly valve in an in-line fire/smoke damper
  • Foil backed fiberglass
  • Red cementitious flooring / Magnesite Floor Screed
  • Wallpaper
  • Varnish on a door
  • Pink loose type screed
  • Garage door rope
  • Shaggy bark of an artificial tree in a lobby
  • “ash” in a gas fired fireplace
  • Thinset adhesive used for ceramic tile,
  • Dampers in church organ
  • Layered sound proofing to a floor in a church bell tower
  • Wood type oak veneers made from asbestos at the old 'Turners Asbestos Factory' in Manchester UK
  • Padding as a sound proofing behind ornate plaster in a Victorian ballroom
  • Fire curtain
  • W.C. cisterns
  • Rocks sold for carving pendants
  • Chimney flu from a hot water heater
  • Surround from an industrial extraction fan
  • Thin (3-5mm thick) foam inserts lining the inside of doors to process control panels
  • Bitumen of the roads
  • Building pads
  • Improvised cricket pitch
  • Cubic yard blocks of concrete
  • Fiber backing of berber carpet
  • Terrazzo floors(red)
  • Concrete door Thresholds
  • Hotel rooms with acm fire doors
  • Concrete floor patching
  • Asphalt flooring (similar to blacktop)
  • Duct-wrap type thin Sheet Paper-Slip/vapor barrier of a built up roof system
  • Duct-wrap type thin Sheet Paper-Behind original metal classroom row lights
  • Hollow fire Doors - Heavy 1/4" thick mastic on interior
  • Gypsum Plank Floor Mastic Vapor Barrier
  • File cabinets/safe insulation
  • Wall paper
  • EPDM Roof Lap sealant
  • Cable Conduit in manholes - thick, brown, fibrous asphaltic "pipes"
  • Terazzo with asbestos
  • Aircraft engine sealant/gasket - extemely hard, clear to tan, epoxy possibly
  • Caulk at wall to floor junction - looks like window glazing
  • Inside of stacks at a former steel plant
  • Inside main stacks on a tug boat lined with transite
  • Chalkboards
  • Galvanized corrugated metal looking material (Galbestos)
  • Chalkboard mastic
  • Expansion joints of concrete curtain walls
  • White chrysotile material within metal windows
  • Brown paper that wraps fiberglass insulation
  • Rubber roof seam positive
  • Thick paint on cmu walls
  • Aircell sheets on ductwork
  • Granular surfacing, which I initially thought was just dust/debris buildup, on the inside of large Westinghouse motor & generator housings
  • Black cork surfacing on piping
  • Viewing shield of a boiler
  • Pure croccidolite sprayed on the auditorium walls
  • CSI Kits for kids containing fake finger print powder
  • Black asphaltic coating (much like a sink undercoat) on the back side of cast aluminum basketball backboards
  • Mortar between a product called Pyrobar bricks
  • Alpine Slide track was made of ACM transite
  • Under the wood floor, inside what are called sleepers, filled with chrysotile, for noise and or fire protection
  • Electrical wiring where the inner plastic coating contains chrysotile.
  • Plaster as a patching behind an old AIB fume hood
  • Seam mastics between lab counter tops
  • Wire mesh with the white disc for holding glass containers over Bunsen burners
  • Old electronic lab equipment with the thick gray insulating board
  • Chalk boards
  • Lab counter tops and fume hood counter tops
  • Chrysotile mat under lead flooring.
  • Black ACM mastic used to attached a paper/foil jacket to fiberglass pipe insulation
  • ALL WHITE Roofing felt/paper
  • Concrete Foundations
  • Concrete Sidewalks/Driveways
  • Electrical Wire Insulation
  • Drywall
  • Joint Compound
  • Roofing Tar - (Still Sold Today)
  • On the inside of speaker box's in K-12 Schools
  • Drip pan - Clay Liner
  • Window putty
  • Rope
  • Stage curtains
  • Floor Underlayment
  • Fiberglass Paper Backing
  • Fireplace Decorative Logs
  • Concrete expansion-seam caulks
  • Rubber
  • Sub-Flooring Slip Sheet
  • Gray Roofing Paint
  • Brick Mortar
  • Lab Hoods
  • Chalkboards
  • Poured Flooring
  • Furnace Gaskets
  •  

    Note: This list does not include every product that may contain asbestos. It is intended as a general guide to show which types of materials that have been found to contain asbestos.

    CANADA UPDATE:

    OTTAWA, Ontario — Canada's long-awaited ban on asbestos in brake shoes and other products will start sometime in 2019, according to proposed regulations released Jan. 5. The Candian federal government laid out a tough set of proposed new regulations to prohibit the use, sale, import and export of asbestos and products that contain it, as well as the manufacture of products containing the cancer-causing mineral.